New Orleans Pelicans: The scenario game

Nikes on his feet, he’s not trying to cheat. Anthony Davis isn’t skipping a beat. This season hasn’t been like the Heat’s, but that’s for another tweet. 11082013-anthony-davis-pau-gasol-pelicans

The New Orleans Pelicans haven’t had the most successful NBA season thus far. In fact, the team hasn’t been above the .500 mark at all this 2013-2014 season. The Pelicans play their best basketball when three scenarios happen. And no, one scenario is not when the team’s opponent forfeits.

Scenario One:

When the Pelicans score 100 points or more the team wins 69% of their games. That means the team from New Orleans needs to score 100 points every game to be in playoff contention, right? Well, this season the Pelicans have averaged just over 102 points per game. So, if I was a math major the Pelicans should be winning almost 70% of their games this season. Which, if you look at the eight teams in the Western Conference that are in position of making the playoffs, four of those teams win less than 63% of the time.

What does this all mean? Let me explain.

Simply, if the Pelicans score 100 points every game the stats tell us that the team should win about 69% of their games. If stats meant everything the Pelicans would be in the playoff race. New Orleans isn’t going to make the playoffs, which means there is another piece to the puzzle. That other tiny corner piece to the puzzle is that the Pelicans are 14-30 when opponents score 100 points or more on them. Can you say ouch, because that makes Dell Demps become a grouch?

The Pelicans aren’t the best team defensively, but when a team losses three core guys due to injuries I understand why. All season long this team from New Orleans has been getting into deep holes after the first two quarters of games. When the Pelicans are behind after the third quarter their record is 8-29. Double ouch!

On the flip side, if the Pelicans have the lead after the third quarter their record is an impressive 20-9. This team is going to have one bad quarter every game, if the players can limited the damage, they would be in a better place record wise.

Scenario Two:

Tyreke Evans has been the caboose to the Pelican train in these last 12 games. Evans started his first game for the team on Feb. 28, and ever since then his stats have accelerated rapidly. The Pelicans are 8-4 with Evans in the starting lineup, not to mention he is averaging 21.3 points per game in those 12 games. With Davis averaging 26.3 points per game in those 12 games that Evans started, the Pelicans are heading in the right direction, unless someone tries to break this connection between Davis and Evans.

Whenever these two players are on the court at the same time the team wins or has a good chance of pulling the win out. Just leave Evans in the lineup, because he gives this team the spark they never had. Also, Anthony Morrow should have the green light from his coaches to pull up for a three anytime throughout a game. This man had 27 points on Wednesday, helping New Orleans beat the Los Angeles Clippers.

Scenario Three:

There have been 138 overtime games in the NBA this season, and the Pelicans lead the league in overtime wins. With a 5-0 record, all the team has to do is make sure the rest of their games go into overtime. However, that is impossible and ridiculous. So, please guys don’t put your fans through all that.

Score 100 points or more, pick the defensive intensity up and hold opponents to under 100 points or more, keep Evans in the starting lineup and if possible try to tie at the end of four quarters. That is the winning formula for the New Orleans Pelicans.

Nikes on his feet, Mr. Davis isn’t calm in his seat. Leading the league in blocks wearing high socks and trying to stuff his moneybox. The playoffs aren’t in sight, but that doesn’t mean he and his team will stop putting up a fight.

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